Cycling Links for August 1

[Critical Mass cyclist suspects not charged – MyNorthwest.co](http://www.mynorthwest.com/?nid=11&sid=78011)
Looks like the Seattle Critical Mass cyclists that were originally booked after the recent confrontation will not be charged at this time.
[Avoiding the Bicycle Thief – The best locks to protect your wheels.](http://www.slate.com/id/2140083/)
Slate article covering the effectiveness for several different types of popular bike locks.
[Shimano Shuns Cables for Full Electronic Shifting ](http://www.wired.com/gadgets/miscellaneous/news/2008/07/shimano)
[![](http://www.wired.com/images/article/full/2008/07/bike_parts_3_250px.jpg)](http://www.wired.com/gadgets/miscellaneous/news/2008/07/shimano) Shimano’s new electronic shifting system looks pretty cool (and lighter than existing traditional systems), but I’m curious about its power requirements and how it all works. > The derailleurs, whose job is to move the chain from gear to gear as you shift, talk to each other and automatically adjust so the chain doesn’t rub. They also calibrate themselves, so you don’t have to play with cable tension to maintain shift quality as cables stretch and the chain and cogs wear. And although the control buttons have been placed in the traditional location behind the brake levers — so as not to confuse anyone or overly tax that mental overhead — they could be integrated with the ends of time-trial bars, the top of the handlebars or just about anywhere a rider might find convenient.
[Why we need to keep gas above $4](http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/Investing/StrategyLab/Rnd17/P2/TheAmateurJournal20080722.aspx)
I read this idea of minimum gas price through taxation somewhere else on the web recently and really liked it. We’re making progress on reducing consumption, but if we could accelerate that a little more and channel the tax revenue into alternate energy infrastructure and research (rather than reducing corporate taxes like the article suggests- come on!) that would be a lot better than sending more money out of the country.